News

Smoke, it doesn’t just affect the smoker!

Since the Surgeon General’s Report released in 1964, 2.5 million adults who were not smokers themselves have died from secondhand smoke. Secondhand smoke is classified as a combination of smoke from the burning end of a cigarette and the smoke breathed out from a smoker. As we close out National Non-Smoking Week, we wanted to look more closely at the facts of secondhand smoking.

Why is secondhand smoke so harmful?

A non-smoker who is in the same room as a smoker is exposed to the same harmful chemicals from the cigarette. This includes more than 7000 chemicals, 70 of which can cause cancer. Exposure to secondhand smoke has been shown to have a negative effect on the heart and blood vessels and increase the risk of a heart attack and stroke. Even brief exposure to smoke can cause damage to the lining of blood vessels; increasing the chance of a heart attack.

In the case of young children, studies have shown that children whose parents smoke get sick more often, have more lung infections, get more ear infections and are more likely to cough, sneeze and have a shortness of breath. Secondhand smoke exposure can also trigger asthma attacks in kids who previously showed no asthma symptoms.

What can be done to prevent secondhand smoke?

It is important to note that there is no safe level of exposure to smoke. Any exposure is harmful and will have a lasting negative impact. However, there are ways to limit exposure in order to protect you and your loved ones from secondhand smoke:

  • Keep your home and car smoke-free
  • Stay in smoke-free hotels when travelling
  • Do not smoke when pregnant or around children
  • Ask your family, friends and caregivers to not smoke around your children

Want to know more about the benefits of quitting smoking?

Visit Fast Facts and Fact Sheets for more information about nicotine dependence and the health benefits of quitting smoking.

What resources are available to help people become non-smokers?

There are a number of counselling services and support groups available if you want to quit smoking. Click here for a list of support services to help you make your life smoke-free.

Every day is a new day that can be smoke-free.

Source:

https://www.surgeongeneral.gov/library/reports/50-years-of-progress/consumer-guide.pdf

https://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/fact_sheets/secondhand_smoke/health_effects/index.htm

https://www.cancer.org/cancer/cancer-causes/tobacco-and-cancer/secondhand-smoke.html

https://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/fact_sheets/cessation/quitting/index.htm

http://breakitoff.ca/get-it-over-with/break-up-methods/

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These 3 steps will help you quit smoking!

Thinking of quitting smoking? This week during National Non-Smoking Week is the perfect time to quit! While smoking can be a very difficult habit to kick, these 3 steps will help you be on your way to a smoke-free and healthier life.

Source:

http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/HealthyLiving/Quit-Smoking-With-Lifes-Simple-7-Infographic_UCM_453600_SubHomePage.jsp

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20 minutes after not smoking, your body will notice a difference

What happens to your body when you quit smoking

If you or someone you know is trying to quit smoking, now is the time! This week is National Non-Smoking Week. Did you know your body starts feeling positive effects within 20 minutes of not smoking? Your blood pressure and heart rate return to normal in 20 minutes. Within 8 hours of nicotine withdrawal, your body is able to clear the carbon monoxide from your bloodstream.

Watch this video to see what happens to your body the longer you go without smoking.  

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/sgr/2004/posters/20mins/index.htm  

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Can technology help the blind to see?

eSight technology to help those with vision impairment

According to the World Health Organization, an estimated 253 million people worldwide live with vision impairment. Of these people, 36 million are blind while 217 million have moderate to severe impairment to their vision. Companies are on the quest to develop cutting-edge technology to aid the user when the human eye falls short. Here is what is new in the world of accessible technology for the blind and vision impaired: 

eSight

Toronto company eSight is the brainchild of Conrad Lewis, an engineer who has two sisters who are legally blind. Lewis wanted to use his engineering skills to come up with technology that can enable mobility and versatility for the vision impaired. eSight has a high-speed, high-definition camera that captures what the user is looking at and then uses an algorithm to enhance the video feed and display it on two screens in front of the their eyes. The technology aims to help individuals with their daily life, at school and in the workplace. 

BlindSquare

The area of Yonge and St. Clair is quickly becoming the most accessible hub in Toronto for the blind and visually impaired. Many of the businesses in the area are installing beacons to help blind and visually impaired customers shop at their stores. The beacons work with BlindSquare to send information about the store to the individual’s smartphone via a downloadable app. The information helps the person navigate the store by letting them know where there are fixed obstacles such as stairs, cash registers, doors, etc. The Canadian National Institute for the Blind hopes to install beacons in 200 businesses by the end of 2017.

FeelSpace

The German startup FeelSpace has developed a technology that can help the wearer with their sense of direction. The navigation belt gives the person direction via tactile signals; the belt can be worn while walking or biking. For those living with vision impairment, the belt can help them explore their environment and help them get from point A to B.

OrCam

OrCam uses wearable artificial vision to help the user by converting visual information into spoken word. The attachment fits onto glasses and allows the wearer to get information about text (newspapers, books, menus, labels), recognize faces and identify products and money. The device is meant to assist the wearer in their day-to-day tasks thus allowing for a more independent lifestyle.

Technology is constantly changing and it is exciting to see what advancements are out there to assist those with blindness and vision impairment. With the current advancements in accessible technology, visual hurdles may soon be a thing of the past.

Works cited:

http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs282/en/

https://www.esighteyewear.com/

http://www.blindsquare.com/

http://en.feelspace.de/en/

https://www.orcam.com/

https://www.insidetoronto.com/news-story/7549524-yonge-and-st-clair-moves-toward-full-accessibility-for-the-blind/

The Canadian National Institute for the Blind

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Do you know the signs of a deteriorating patient?

It is Canadian Patient Safety Week! 

Research shows that virtually all critical inpatient events are preceded by warning signs that occur approximately six-and-a-half hours in advance. It is important to know these 10 signs of a rapidly deteriorating patient. 

10 signs of a rapidly deteriorating patient

Source: Canadian Patient Safety Institute

 

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It's moving day at Joseph Brant Hospital!

Staff at Burlington's Joseph Brant Hospital are moving approximately 150 patients to the new Michael Lee Chin Tower. The seven story buidling will feature an expanded intensive care unit, an updated lab and nine new operating rooms. The new wing is double the size of the hospital by over 800,000 square feet. 

The new tower was built with the initiative to reduce wait times and improve patient care.

The cost of the project is $350 million. 

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We are having a job fair every Wednesday this summer!

Come out to our job fair every Wednesday this summer! Spectrum Patient Services is currently looking to fill positions for full-time Patient Transfer Drivers (Medical Transfer Attendants). Drop in for an on-site interview!

Time:
Every Wednesday in August
1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Location:
221 Bethridge Road
Etobicoke, ON M9W 1N4

Position Requirements: 

  • Resume
  • Updated First Aid and Level C CPR Certification
  • Valid "G" Ontario Driver's Licence
  • Clean and Current Driver's Abstract

Other Requirements:

  • DPT Immunization (Diphtheria, Pertussis, Tetanus vaccination)
  • Current Police Vulnerable Sector Check
  • Lift test will be required

If you are unable to join us at one of our job fairs, please send your resume directly to HR@spectrumpatientservices.com

Contact:
Tel: 1-866-527-9191
HR@spectrumpatientservices.com

Hope to see you there!

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Got electricity? See these 5 new electrical vehicles that are too cool for fuel.

Electric vehicles (EV), also known as electric drive vehicles, are cars powered by electric motors rather than petroleum fuel. The first EV was invented by a Slovak-Hungarian priest named Ányos Jedlik in 1827. EVs today have changed drastically and are giving traditional fuel-powered cars a run for their money.

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Join us at our job fairs!

Spectrum Patient Services is hiring full-time Patient Transfer Drivers (Medical Transfer Attendants). Come out to our job fair for an on-site interview!

Time:
July 19
1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Location:
221 Bethridge Road
Etobicoke, ON M9W 1N4

Position Requirements: 

  • Resume
  • Updated First Aid and Level C CPR Certification
  • Valid "G" Ontario Driver's Licence
  • Clean and Current Driver's Abstract

Other Requirements:

  • DPT Immunization (Diphtheria, Pertussis, Tetanus vaccination)
  • Current Police Vulnerable Sector Check
  • Lift test will be required

If you are unable to join us at one of our job fairs, please send your resume directly to HR@spectrumpatientservices.com

Contact:
Tel: 1-866-527-9191
HR@spectrumpatientservices.com

Looking forward to seeing you there!

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Paramedic Services Week: And that's a wrap!

As we conclude Paramedic Services Week .....

We'd like to show how much we appreciate all the work that paramedics do.

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